How to Set the Sag on a Dirt Bike

There are a few different ways to set the sag on your dirt bike, but the most common and effective method is to use a zip tie. First, find a spot on the rear of the bike where you can place the zip tie around the frame. Next, sit on the bike in your normal riding position and have someone else pull the zip tie tight.

The amount of space between the top of the tire and the bottom of the swingarm should be approximately 2-3 inches. If it’s too high or low, adjust accordingly and repeat until it’s perfect!

  • The first step is to measure the distance from the ground to the center of the axle
  • The second step is to measure the distance from the ground to the top of the fork tube
  • The third step is to subtract the first measurement from the second measurement
  • This will give you the amount of sag that you need to set on your bike
  • The fourth step is to loosen the preload adjusters on your forks
  • The fifth step is to turn one preload adjuster clockwise and the other counterclockwise until you have achieved the desired amount of sag
  • The sixth and final step is to re-tighten your preload adjusters and go ride

Credit: www.youtube.com

What Should the Sag Be on a Dirt Bike?

The sag on a dirt bike is the amount that the rear suspension sinks under the weight of the rider. It is important to have the proper sag set because it affects how the bike handles and how well it maintains traction while cornering. If the sag is too low, the bike will bottom out easily and may become unstable.

If the sag is too high, the bike will be less responsive to rider input and may feel “floaty.” The ideal sag setting will vary depending on riding style and terrain, but generally speaking, most riders prefer a setting between 30% and 35%.

What Should My Sag Be Set At?

If you’re unsure of what your SAG (static air gap) should be set at on your forks, don’t worry – you’re not alone. Many riders go through the same process of trial and error to find their perfect setting. Here’s a quick guide to help you get started.

First, it’s important to know that the SAG refers to the amount of suspension travel that is used when you’re sitting on your bike in your riding gear. This means that if you have your suspension set too stiff, you won’t be able to use all of the travel when hitting bumps or going over jumps. Conversely, if your SAG is set too soft, your fork will bottom out more easily.

To find your ideal SAG setting, start by fully extending your forks and measuring the distance from the top of the stanchion tube to the end of the travel. This is known as your “full extension.” Next, compress your forks fully and measure again – this time from the top of the stanchion tube to where it meets the crown race.

This second measurement is known as “full compression.” Finally, take a third measurement with you seated on your bike in riding gear – this time from the top of the stanchion tube down to where it meets the crown race again. The difference between this measurement and full compression is called “sag.”

Ideally, sag should be around 20-30% of total fork travel for XC riding and 25-35% for trail riding. This gives you enough support while pedaling and climbing without sacrificing too much plushness when descending or hitting square-edged bumps. If you’re having trouble getting these numbers with factory settings, try adjusting preload first – most forks have an external knob or screw for this purpose near where one leg enters the crown/uppermost part of the fork assembly.

If that doesn’t do it, then it’s time to look at swapping out springs (or air chambers if yours is an air-sprung fork). Heavier riders will usually need firmer springs while lighter riders can usually get away with softer ones – but there are many other factors that affect spring rate so experimentation is key here!

How Much Free Sag Should a Dirt Bike Have?

When it comes to setting up the suspension on your dirt bike, one of the most important things to get right is the amount of free sag. This is the amount that the suspension compresses when you sit on the bike in the riding position with all your gear on. Too little sag and the bike will be too stiff, making it hard to control and ride smoothly.

Too much sag and it will feel like the bike is bottoming out all the time. So how do you know how much free sag to set? A good starting point is around 100-105mm for the rear suspension and 30-35mm for the front suspension.

This will give you a balance between a plush ride and good control. From here, you can adjust depending on your weight, riding style, and track conditions. If you’re a lighter rider or racing on smooth tracks, you can go with less sag.

If you’re a heavier rider or hitting some rougher terrain, then more sag may be needed. As a general rule of thumb, aim for about 25-30% of your total travel as free sag. So if your rear shock has 200mm of travel, aim for 50-60mm of free sag.

And if your forks have 150mm of travel, aim for 38-45mm of free sag. These are just guidelines though – ultimately it’s up to you to experiment and find what works best for you and your dirt bike!

How Do You Set a Sag by Yourself?

There are a few different ways that you can set your sag by yourself, but the most common and effective method is using a zip tie. First, you’ll want to measure the distance from the top of your fork tube to the ground. Once you have this measurement, take off all of your air pressure and then add in 10-20% more.

For example, if your forks have 100 PSI in them originally, you would add 10-20 PSI more to get to 110-120 PSI. Next, you’ll need a zip tie long enough to go around your fork tube and still have some slack. Attach the zip tie around your fork tube at the very top, making sure it’s tight enough that it won’t slip down as you’re compressing your forks.

Now, sit on your bike in the riding position and have someone else hold it steady while you slowly bounce up and down on the saddle a few times. As you’re doing this, keep an eye on the zip tie – you want it to barely move up and down the fork tube. If it starts moving too much, either add or release air from your forks until it’s just right.

Once you’ve found the perfect amount of sag for your weight and riding style, let out all of the air from your forks so that they’re completely empty again. Now put exactly that same amount of air back in – no more, no less! This will ensure that both sides of your forks are perfectly balanced; otherwise, one side might be a little softer or harder than the other which will affect how evenly they compress when hitting bumps in the trail.

How To Set Sag on a Dirt Bike

Dirt Bike Sag Calculator

If you’re a dirt bike rider, then you know how important it is to have your bike set up just right. One of the most important aspects of setting up your bike is getting the sag correct. Sag is the amount that your suspension compresses when you sit on your bike.

If you don’t have the sag set correctly, then your ride will be uncomfortable and won’t perform as well as it could. There are a few different ways that you can calculate sag. The first way is to use a tape measure.

Measure from the center of the axle to a point on the frame where the suspension meets (usually near the footpegs). Then, get on your bike and have someone else measure from that same point to the top of your helmet. The difference between these two measurements is your sag.

How to Adjust Dirt Bike Suspension to Your Weight

One of the most important things you can do to improve your dirt bike riding is to adjust your suspension to match your weight. This may seem like a no-brainer, but many riders don’t take the time to do it and end up with a sub-par experience. The first step is to find out what your sag is.

This is how much your suspension compresses when you sit on the bike in the riding position. You can measure this by putting the bike on a stand and using a tape measure to see how much the rear end sinks down. Ideally, you want around 20-30mm of sag for motocross and slightly less for off-road riding.

Once you know your sag, you can start adjusting preload, compression, and rebound damping to get the perfect ride for your weight. Preload adjusts how much force is required to compress the forks or shock, while compression damping controls how quickly they spring back after being compressed. Rebound damping determines how quickly the forks or shock return to their original position after going over a bump.

If you’re not sure where to start, there are plenty of online resources that can help you dial in your suspension for different kinds of riding. Or, if you’d rather leave it to the experts, many motorcycle shops offer suspension services that will set everything up perfectly for your weight and riding style.

How to Measure Sag on a Dirt Bike

If you’re an avid dirt bike rider, then you know that one of the most important aspects of riding is having your suspension set up correctly. One of the key elements in setting up your suspension is sag. Sag is the amount that your bike’s suspension sinks under your weight when you’re sitting on it in Riding Position.

Measuring sag properly is crucial in order to get optimal performance out of your bike. There are a few different ways that you can measure sag. The first way is by using a tape measure.

Simply sit on your bike in Riding Position and have someone else measure the distance from the ground to a specific point on your bike (usually the axle). Once you have this measurement, have them measure again without you on the bike to get the Free Sag measurement. Subtracting these two numbers will give you your Static Sag number.

Ideally, you want this number to be between 20-35mm for a motocross bike and 25-40mm for an enduro/trail bike. Another way to measure sag is by using race stands. This method is more accurate than using a tape measure and is how most professional riders and teams do it.

To use race stands, simply place them under each side of the rear wheel and raise the back end of the bike until it’s level with the front (in Riding Position). Once it’s level, take note of how much height was added to each side – this will be your Static Sag number. Again, aim for 20-35mm for motocross bikes and 25-40mm for enduro/trail bikes.

How to Set Sag on a Dirt Bike With a Tape Measure

Setting sag on a dirt bike is one of the most important aspects of suspension tuning. Sag is the amount that the suspension compresses under the weight of the rider and bike. It’s critical to have a proper sag setting so that the bike handles well and rides at the correct height.

There are many factors that affect sag, such as rider weight, type of terrain, and riding style. There are two types of sag- static and dynamic. Static sag is measured with the rider off the bike, while dynamic sag is measured with the rider on the bike in the riding position.

Most riders will set their static sag first, then adjust dynamic sag as needed. To measure static sag, simply place a tape measure on the top of the fork tube and compress the forks until they bottom out. Measure how much they compressed and this will be your static Sag number.

For most riders, a good starting point is 30-35mm of compression for front forks and 20-25mm for rear shocks. Dynamic Sag can be a bit trickier to measure accurately, but it’s important to do it right so that your settings are consistent. First, find a level spot to park your bike or use a stand if you have one handy.

Sit on your bike in the normal riding position and have someone help support it so that it doesn’t fall over when you let go. Now gently bounce up and down on the seat a few times to settle into position, then get off the bike without moving it too much. Again using a tape measure, check how much travel there is between where your forks/shock were at rest (fully extended) and where they are now (compressed under your weight).

This number is your dynamic Sag number – aim for around 25-30% of total travel for both front and rear suspension systems. If you’re not within these ballpark numbers after adjusting preload, then you’ll need to make changes to either your spring rate or air pressure. If you’re still having trouble getting things dialed in, consider taking your bike to a professional suspension tuner for help.

Conclusion

In conclusion, if you are looking to set the sag on your dirt bike, begin by measuring the distance between the wheel sprocket and the ground. Next, determine how much sag you want on your bike. Finally, make sure that the sag is properly balanced before adding weight to it.

Similar Posts